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Thursday, April 17, 2021

When phishing attempts wind up in C-level inboxes, a new scale of Web-trawling terminology is necessary:

The tactic of aiming at the rich and powerful with an online scam is referred to by computer security experts as whaling. The term is a play on phishing, an approach that usually involves tricking e-mail users — in this case the big fish — into divulging personal information like credit card numbers. Phishing attacks that are directed at a particular person, rather than blasted out to millions, are also known as spear phishing.

Ahoy, thar they blow! As always, these easily-duped CEOs need to check the URL string in the status bar — ahem, “periscope” — to avoid this Internet-borne scurvy.

by Costa Tsiokos, Thu 04/17/2008 11:30:48 AM
Category: Internet, Wordsmithing
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  1. I have read that this was a recent example of what they call a whaling attack – a phishing attack targeting executives in corporate offices like CEO’s, etc.. There have been many articles and blogs suggesting that this attack was especially sophisticated and difficult for spam filters to catch.

    Remember, that it is not legal to send a subpoena via email unless it has been agreed to by all parties. Also the URL for all U.S. federal courts is “courtname.uscourts.gov” and not
    “uscourts.com” as listed in the email. So beware of this and other sophisticated phishing attacks. The Abaca Email Protection Gateway (www.abaca.com) service was the only service I know that quarantined these emails.

    Comment by victor louis — 04/18/2008 @ 03:03:49 AM

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