Population Statistic: Read. React. Repeat.
Sunday, February 11, 2021

isn't that special
What’s the perfect cure for Super Bowl Sunday hangover, one week removed? Why, the National Hockey League Special Teams Index.

Compare the shifts with last week’s rankings, and note that the higher-ranked power play breaks ties in STI Number. And now the rundown:

STI Rank Team PP % (Rank) PK % (Rank) STI Number
1 San Jose Sharks 23.4 (1) 84.5 (8) 107.9
2 Montreal Canadiens 22.1 (2) 84.2 (9) 106.3
3 Vancouver Canucks 17.3 (14) 88.7 (1) 106.0
4 Anaheim Ducks 20.7 (3) 84.8 (5) 105.5
5 Nashville Predators 17.1 (17) 86.2 (3) 103.3
6 Dallas Stars 18.2 (11) 84.2 (10) 102.4
7 New Jersey Devils 17.4 (12) 84.7 (7) 102.1
8 Edmonton Oilers 15.3 (27) 86.8 (2) 102.1
9 Minnesota Wild 17.0 (18) 84.8 (6) 101.8
10 Ottawa Senators 17.4 (13) 84.2 (11) 101.6
11 Pittsburgh Penguins 20.6 (4) 80.5 (24) 101.1
12 Florida Panthers 18.6 (9) 82.2 (15) 100.8
13 Boston Bruins 18.9 (8) 81.6 (18) 100.5
14 New York Rangers 18.5 (10) 82.0 (17) 100.5
15 Philadelphia Flyers 15.5 (26) 85.0 (4) 100.5
16 Colorado Avalanche 19.3 (5) 80.3 (25) 99.6
17 Detroit Red Wings 16.6 (21) 83.0 (14) 99.6
18 Carolina Hurricanes 16.0 (23) 83.3 (12) 99.3
19 Buffalo Sabres 17.2 (16) 81.6 (19) 98.8
20 Washington Capitals 17.0 (20) 81.3 (21) 98.3
21 Toronto Maple Leafs 18.9 (7) 79.1 (27) 98.0
22 Calgary Flames 17.3 (15) 80.6 (23) 97.9
23 Columbus Blue Jackets 15.8 (25) 81.5 (20) 97.3
24 Tampa Bay Lightning 19.3 (6) 77.9 (29) 97.2
25 New York Islanders 15.8 (24) 81.1 (22) 96.9
26 St. Louis Blues 13.5 (29) 82.1 (16) 95.6
27 Los Angeles Kings 17.0 (19) 78.5 (28) 95.5
28 Chicago Blackhawks 11.5 (30) 83.3 (13) 94.8
29 Phoenix Coyotes 14.8 (28) 79.7 (26) 94.5
30 Atlanta Thrashers 16.5 (22) 77.9 (30) 94.4
by Costa Tsiokos, Sun 02/11/2021 11:49:28 PM
Category: Hockey
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final count
One of the casualties from my recent monthlong blog outage was the conclusion to my series of posts testing whether or not energy drink Enviga really did burn calories with regular intake.

As it happens, the blog went kaput with just a couple of days/posts to go on my experiment. So I actually did wrap up my 3-cans-a-day diet of Enviga back in December. I haven’t touched the stuff since.

That’s not necessarily an indictment of the product. I got used to the taste of it after putting away 90 cans of the stuff (3 a day for 30 days, which I figured was more than enough for my unscientific testing). But given that I rarely imbibed energy drinks before starting this madness, I definitely overloaded on Enviga during that period. And so it’ll take a while before I feel the urge to pop another one open. In fact, one can remains in my fridge — a Peach flavored one. I think it’ll stay there for a while.

Anyway, on to the results: Did I burn more calories with all the Enviga chugging?

Based solely on weight levels, which to me is a fair indicator of calorie churn, the answer is: No.

By the end of the monthlong trial period, my weight was exactly the same as it was at the start of all that Enviga-ing. I went through period of weight loss and weight gain, some of which are noted within this category of posts. But I can’t see anything that points to the energy drink being an active agent in this. I regularly go through minor (5-10 pounds) weight fluctuations; it’s a regular part of my physiology and metabolism. Had I not been doing the Enviga, I’m pretty confident that I’d have gone through the same deal.

So, for what it’s worth: My personal Enviga experiment yielded no evidence that it’s really a “calorie burner”, as marketing for the drink somewhat obliquely puts across. Since Coca Cola and NestlĂ© are now being sued over misleading claims to that effect, I only hope that I don’t get called on the stand as a trial exhibit!

Beyond that, it seems to me — strictly anecdotally — that Enviga isn’t particuarly catching on. I’ve seen a decided decrease in ads for the stuff around New York. It’s still on store shelves, but I’ve yet to spot it out in the wild, i.e. in the grips of passerbys on Manhattan streets. Doesn’t bode well for the longterm prospects. Enviga might not be long for this consumer realm.

by Costa Tsiokos, Sun 02/11/2021 08:39:08 PM
Category: Enviga, Science
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I suppose folks still plan their vacations around a visit to the Grand Canyon.

But to me, it seems like such an old-fashioned, bygone way to spend your leisure time. In fact, the first thing that comes to mind is that “Brady Bunch” adventure to the park (actually a two-parter EDIT: Make that a three-parter]). Since I’ve never been there (and don’t intend to), this more or less makes the Canyon a product of television and the 1970s, on a strictly perceptional level, for me.

Perhaps that’ll change if plans by the Hualapai Tribe, the Native American stewards of the Canyon, come to pass. The tribe wants to construct Skywalk, a massive steel-and-glass tourist walkway that will jut out 70 feet beyond the Canyon’s edge.

This stab at commercialization is facing criticism:

“It’s the equivalent of an upscale carnival ride,” said Robert Arnberger, a former superintendent of Grand Canyon National Park who was born near the canyon’s South Rim. “Why would they desecrate this place with this?”…

“What the Grand Canyon needs most is a place for quiet contemplation and recreation,” said Kieran Suckling, policy director for the Center for Biological Diversity, an Arizona-based environmental group. “The Skywalk is part of a process that is turning the canyon into a tacky commercial playground.”

I’m inclined to give the Hualapai the benefit of the doubt. Now, if they decide to plant a casino out there on this giant overhang, then I’ll slap on the “tacky” label.

by Costa Tsiokos, Sun 02/11/2021 07:43:51 PM
Category: Political, TV
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