Population Statistic: Read. React. Repeat.
Sunday, November 13, 2021

substantive
I realize I should know better than to listen to anything the ESPN Sunday Night Football crew say, but I couldn’t miss a curious comment just now, at the start of tonight’s Cleveland-Pittsburgh game.

One of the talking heads — either Joe Thiesmann or Mike Patrick — was ruminating on Browns QB Trent Dilfer. He was talking about how often he interviewed Dilfer during his draft year in 1994, and dropped a quip about how Dilfer had been coming out of Fresno State on the heels of dealing with a substance abuse problem.

Substance abuse? Dilfer? I don’t remember a thing about that, and I think I would. Dilfer was drafted sixth overall in the ‘94 draft by Tampa Bay; that was right at the time that I started working at the St. Petersburg Times Sports Department. I heard just about all the early buzz about Dilfer, and don’t recall a single thing about any sort of issues with him when he came out of college. In fact, he never would have been drafted as high as he was if he had drug/alcohol/performance enhancement baggage.

If you knew anything about Dilfer’s background, the idea of him as a doper is even more ludicrous. He’s Mr. Clean, a practical choirboy. He married his high school sweetheart while young, wears his cross on his sleeve, and is generally a straight shooter. It’s highly unlikely that he ever abused himself with anything more potent than a warm beer.

I think the Sunday Night crew had Dilfer confused with someone else. Easy slip of the tongue. But it’s important to cut something like this in the bud, before it gains life as a rumor.

- Costa Tsiokos, Sun 11/13/2005 09:08:04 PM
Category: Football | Permalink | Feedback (3)


The popular expression goes like this:

“No matter where you go, there you are.”

By simply transpositioning a couple of the words, you come up with phraseology that has a deeper meaning, I think:

“No matter where you are, there you go.”

Think about it.

- Costa Tsiokos, Sun 11/13/2005 04:35:37 PM
Category: General | Permalink | Feedback


youth demographer
Who would think that the oldest member of the “American Chopper” Teutul trio would be the most popular with the kiddies? Goofball Mikey enlightens on one part of Orange County Choppers’ mass appeal:

But this family’s unique brand of bikes and bickering flat-out works.

“It’s my father,” Mikey says. “He’s a spectacle.

“You know what’s the interesting thing about him? Children love him. I think it’s because he looks like a cartoon character. I swear to God. Kids cry when they see me. But they smile when they see him. They go for his mustache.”

Paul Sr. as a cuddly Yosemite Sam? Tarnation!

So what does that make Mikey?

“Man, what about when I’m a has-been?” Mikey says. “Are people going to treat me like Vanilla Ice?”

Slice like a ninja, cut like a razor blade, Mikey? Let’s hope not.

- Costa Tsiokos, Sun 11/13/2005 04:11:20 PM
Category: Reality Check, Pop Culture | Permalink | Feedback


On the way out of Target yesterday, the magazine pictured here caught my eye. So prominent is the Google logo on the cover (taking up the top third, as a magazine title would) that I wondered if the Internet behemoth hadn’t launched its own magazine.

I was skeptical, because it’s unlikely that Google would have gone into periodicals publishing without me hearing about it — and I hadn’t heard about it. Plus, despite the addition of the Google Talk in the lower portion of the cover, that “buried treasures” stripe in the middle suggests something fishy.

It turns out that this mag isn’t directly Google-produced. This title is something called the “Smart Computing Reference Series Guide to Google”. It’s basically a dummies’ guide to digging into the search engine’s Advanced Features, probably with an eye toward work-at-home possibilities. My guess is this is something akin to all those ancillary eBay middleman businesses.

I can’t find anything about who’s actually publishing this thing (then again, I’m not looking particularly hard). I assume they’re doing it with Google’s cooperation, which would explain the prominent newsstand display at Target and other locations. Otherwise, someone’s due for a nice cease-and-desist letter addressed from Mountain View.

I doubt this is any sort of test balloon for a true Google Magazine. That’s not to say that it’ll never happen, the passing of “Yahoo! Internet Life” three years ago notwithstanding.

- Costa Tsiokos, Sun 11/13/2005 02:53:05 PM
Category: Internet, Publishing | Permalink | Feedback (1)


I’m sure you all remember Tom Green. If not, you can give him a call at (310) 717-1919 and reacquaint yourself. Maybe have a beer together.

Hey, don’t call me a narc! Green himself exorts you to call him on his blog. I’m just spreading the love.

I don’t think I’ll be following Green’s example. I don’t want any freaks calling me up day and night. Besides, my cell number’s in the 727 area code — a far cry from Green’s show-biz chic 310 tag.

- Costa Tsiokos, Sun 11/13/2005 10:57:22 AM
Category: Bloggin', Celebrity | Permalink | Feedback


Here’s a quick test, where will it display?
- Costa Tsiokos, Sun 11/13/2005 09:26:06 AM
Category: Creative | Permalink | Comments Off