Population Statistic: Read. React. Repeat.
Tuesday, September 06, 2021

and not one piece more
I took this shot in a local supermarket. I couldn’t tell you the brand name of the bag of chocolate mint candies, but the number of pieces per bag obviously struck me as unique.

Forty-three? Why that odd number? I understand standard counts like 10, 20, 25 even. But 43? Why not up it to a full 50, or else save a some money and downgrade to 40?

I wonder if this is somehow related to that 43 Things… thing.

by Costa Tsiokos, Tue 09/06/2021 11:25pm
Category: Florida Livin', Food
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While publishers keep churning out teen-oriented entertainment titles like Teen People and CosmoGirl!, it appears that not all the youngsters are biting: Teen girls often opt for the grown-up original-source magazines when digging on celebrity dish.

Why? Aside from cheap cover price and quickie weekly schedule, it’s because when you’re young, you don’t necessarily want to be labeled as such:

“Anyone who works in teen magazines understands that teens aspire to be older and want to read up (in age),” says Anastasia Goodstein, a San Francisco-based writer who publishes Ypulse, a blog about Generation Y for media and marketing professionals.

And lest you think these magazines don’t have an impact:

While magazines such as Teen Vogue and Elle Girl are still lauded for having a hold on teen fashion, entertainment weeklies also are making their way into that arena — in large part because so many girls are interested in dressing like the stars.

“A girl 11, 12, 13 will see Paris Hilton wearing something and I’m told by shop owners that they’ll bring the magazine with them and say ‘I want to wear that,’” says Ken Baker, West Coast executive editor at Us Weekly.

That has led editors at his magazine and others to include details about where readers can buy clothing and accessories — some at relatively inexpensive prices.

“Celebrity has become the most powerful marketing tool,” Baker notes. “Teens identify with them and maybe aspire to look like them. The celebrities are brought down to a human level now, and it almost makes them more powerful.”

I think the magazine biz needs a more compact strategy for audience capture: Dispense with the teen/tween targeting, and lead them from Highlights straight to In Style.

by Costa Tsiokos, Tue 09/06/2021 10:52pm
Category: Publishing, Society
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Nothing like a sea chanty to stir widespread interest. After penning my contention that “What Shall We Do with a Drunken Sailor?” is more of a hockey song than a football ditty, I shot off an email on the subject to the New York Times‘ Stuart Elliott, who wrote the original piece about the (separate) Toyota advertising-campaign controversy.

I’m happy to say he was impressed enough with it to include it in his weekly email newsletter (not available online, unfortunately):

Q: Dear Stuart: Being a pretty avid sports fan, I can tell you that linking “Drunken Sailor” and football simply never occurs to me. However, there’s another sport that comes instantly to mind whenever I hear the tune: hockey. If that tune (really just the melody, not the lyrics) is associated with any sport, it’s the one on the ice, not on the gridiron.

(This reader included a link to an entry on his blog, written in response to the item here last week. An excerpt: “Am I crazy or is ‘Drunken Sailor’ not more closely associated with hockey? I can’t ever recall hearing the tune at a football game, but I’d bet it has been played at every single N.H.L. game I’ve ever attended. It is a natural on the electric organ, after all. Could it be that the N.H.L.’s recent lockout also took out the memory of ‘Drunken Sailor’ at the big-league rink?”)

It’d have been nice if he had included a couple of links back this way, but no biggie.

I maintain that “Drunken Sailor” is a hockey song. Screw football. They can have that lame-assed “Rock and Roll, Part II”, if they want it.

by Costa Tsiokos, Tue 09/06/2021 10:16pm
Category: Advert./Mktg., Football, Hockey
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So while playing my “guess what’s new on my blog” game (the cat comes out of the bag tomorrow!), Chaz engaged in some mild self-deprecation:

This is true. I was reading some of my spring ‘04 posts, and there was a lot more of “I wrote that?” than I would have thought possible.

I don’t know how coincidental it is, since I’m guessing most bloggers go over their old material every so often. But it so happens that I had recently scoped through some of my archives (in the old BlogSpot digs, no less) at about the same time the above comment was submitted. And, far from being embarrassed, I have to say: I was rather damned impressed with the quality to be found within a one-week chunk of bloggity-blogging.

But judge for yourself. The best of the best from the late, great “The Critical I”, April 18-24, 2004. Forgive any resulting obsolescence; two years in Internet time is a veritable eternity, after all. And sadly, the comments are long gone (having been enabled with the free version of HaloScan, which stores them for only a few months):

- WI-FI THE PUBLIC LIBRARIES!

- PLAYOFF AFRO

- IS PRINT STICKIER?

- BROWN BUTTERFLY

- MEMORIES OF STICKIN’ IT TO THE MAN, EARTH DAY-STYLE

- DYING YOUNG VIA POETRY (which I like so much, and is so short, that I’ll reproduce here):

Roses are red,
How red is my rose?
Poets die young,
I’ll stick with my prose.

- “AN OPERA IN THREE PERIODS AND ONE OVERTIME”

- THE MOST BORING SEX COLUMNIST EVER

- FATHERS AND SONS, IN THE SOUTH AND QUEBEC

- LOG CABIN REPUBLICANS: THE BATTERED WIVES OF AMERICAN POLITICS

- OR MATT DAMON, IF HE’S AVAILABLE

- GEARHEAD GLISSADE

by Costa Tsiokos, Tue 09/06/2021 09:43pm
Category: Bloggin'
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