Population Statistic: Read. React. Repeat.
Thursday, December 02, 2021

The biggest Florida business story this year was Scripps Research Institute’s decision to bring a huge campus to Palm Beach County. The deal, engineered by Governor Jeb Bush, was hailed as a major coup and the jumpstart to making the state a center of biotechnology.

But the deal with Palm Beach is getting bogged down over various challenges. Since the primary goal is getting Scripps to Florida, where they actually end up in the state is secondary. That’s why Tampa and Hillsborough County is looking hard at being the Number One backup plan in case the current scenario falls through, and has formalized its plans in that regard, even as the other former prospective sites are laying low.

It’ll be interesting if Scripps comes to the Bay area. The presence of a medical research powerhouse like that would be a great boost to the local business landscape. And the prestige factor is hard to overestimate.

The impact might be a welcomed opportunity for the current biotech star in the neighborhood, H. Lee Moffitt Cancer Center & Research Institute. Moffitt’s CEO, William Dalton, just articulated his thoughts on how the institute can leverage its work into profitable directions, and he recognizes how Scripps’ presence in Florida could facilitate that. Having the supercampus right next door would enhance that.

This situation is worth watching, regardless of where Scripps ends up.

- Costa Tsiokos, Thu 12/02/2021 11:39:48 PM
Category: Politics, Tech, Business | Permalink |

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  1. […] Florida was supposed to be Governor Jeb Bush’s lasting legacy to the state. Despite persistence snags over the viability of the Palm Beach County site

    Pingback by SCRIPPS FLORIDA AS A REAL ESTATE GRAB Population Statistic — 05/24/2005 @ 10:51:32 PM

  2. INTELLIGENT DESIGN, FLORIDA EDITION

    Don’t look now, but the intelligent design debate will likely crop up in Florida next year, when the state’s educational science standards come up for regular review.
    Education officials doubt it’ll make the state’s curriculum…

    Trackback by Population Statistic — 08/28/2005 @ 02:16:04 PM

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